Menu
Home Page
Home Page

Greenfield Primary School

Imagine, Believe, Succeed

EYFS

Mathematics in EYFS

The EYFS framework is structured very differently to the national curriculum as it is organised across seven areas of learning rather than subject areas. 

The table below outlines the most relevant statements taken from the Early Learning Goals in the EYFS statutory framework and the Development Matters age ranges for Three and Four-Year-Olds and Reception to match the programme of study for mathematics.

The most relevant statements for mathematics are taken from the following areas of learning:

  • Communication and Language
  • Mathematics

 

Mathematical Vocabulary

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Communication and Language

  • Use a wider range of vocabulary.
  • Understand ‘why’ questions, like: “why do you think the caterpillar is so fat?”

Reception

Communication and Language

  • Learn new vocabulary.
  • Use new vocabulary throughout the day.

ELG

Communication and Language

Speaking

  • Participate in small group, class and one-to-one discussions, offering their own ideas, using recently introduced vocabulary.

Number and Place Value

Counting

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Recite numbers past 5.
  • Say one number name for each item in order: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5.
  • Know that the last number reached when counting a small set of objects tells you how many there are in total (‘cardinal principle’).

Reception

Mathematics

  • Count objects, actions and sounds.
  • Count beyond ten.

ELG

Mathematics

Numerical Patterns

  • Verbally count beyond 20, recognising the pattern of the counting system.

Identifying, Representing and Estimating Numbers

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Fast recognition of up to 3 objects, without having to count them individually (‘subitising’).
  • Show ‘finger numbers’ up to 5.
  • Link numerals and amounts: for example, showing the right number of objects to match the numeral, up to 5.
  • Experiment with their own symbols and marks as well as numerals.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Subitise.
  • Link the number symbol (numeral) with its cardinal number value.

ELG

Mathematics

Number

  • Subitise (recognising quantities without counting) up to 5.

Reading and Writing Numbers

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Link numerals and amounts: for example, showing the right number of objects to match the numeral, up to 5.
  • Experiment with their own symbols and marks as well as numerals.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Link the number symbol (numeral) with its cardinal number value.

Compare and Order Numbers

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Compare quantities using language: ‘more than’, ‘fewer than’.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Compare numbers.

ELG

Mathematics

Numerical Patterns

  • Compare quantities up to 10 in different contexts, recognising when one quantity is greater than, less than or the same as the other quantity.

Understanding Place Value

Reception

Mathematics

  • Understand the ‘one more than/one less than’ relationship between consecutive numbers.
  • Explore the composition of numbers to 10.

ELG

Mathematics

Number

  • Have a deep understanding of numbers to 10, including the composition of each number.

Solve Problems

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Solve real world mathematical problems with numbers up to 5.

Addition and Subtraction

Mental Calculations

Reception

Mathematics

  • Automatically recall number bonds for numbers 0-10.

ELG

Mathematics

Number

  • Automatically recall (without reference to rhymes, counting or other aids) number bonds up to 5 (including subtraction facts) and some number bonds to 10, including double facts.

Solve Problems

ELG

Mathematics

Numerical Patterns

  • Explore and represent patterns within numbers up to 10, including evens and odds, double facts and how quantities can be distributed evenly.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Subitise.
  • Link the number symbol (numeral) with its cardinal number value.

Measurement

Describe, Measure, Compare and Solve (All Strands)

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Make comparisons between objects relating to size, length, weight and capacity.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Compare length, weight and capacity.

Telling the Time

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Begin to describe a sequence of events, real or fictional, using words, such as ‘first’, ‘then…’

Properties of Shapes

Recognise 2D and 3D Shapes and their Properties

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Talk about and explore 2D and 3D shapes (for example, circles, rectangles, triangles and cuboids) using informal and mathematical language: ‘sides’, ‘corners’, ‘straight’, ‘flat’, ‘round’.
  • Select shapes appropriately: flat surfaces for a building, a triangular pattern for a roof, etc.
  • Combine shapes to make new ones – an arch, a bigger triangle, etc.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Select, rotate and manipulate shapes in order to develop spatial reasoning skills.

Compare and Classify Shapes

Reception

Mathematics

  • Compose and decompose shapes so that children can recognise a shape can have other shapes within it, just as numbers can.

Position and Direction

Position, Direction and Movement

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Understand position through words alone – for example, “The bag is under the table,” – with no pointing.
  • Describe a familiar route.
  • Discuss routes and locations, using words like ‘in front of’ and ‘behind’.

Reception

Understanding the World

  • Draw information from a simple map.

Patterns

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Talk about and identify the patterns around them. For example, stripes on clothes, designs on rugs and wallpaper. Use informal language like ‘pointy’, ‘spotty’, ‘blobs’, etc.
  • Extend and create ABAB patterns – stick, leaf, stick, leaf.
  • Notice and correct an error in a repeating pattern.

Reception

Mathematics

  • Continue, copy and create repeating patterns.

Statistics

Record, Present and Interpret Data

Three and Four-Year-Olds

Mathematics

  • Experiment with their own symbols and marks, as well as numerals.

 

Top